Photo 3 Jun 4 notes thenuclearblog:

Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment
The Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was an experimental molten-salt nuclear reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researching this technology through the 1960s; constructed by 1964, it went critical in 1965 and was operated until 1969.
The MSRE was a 7.4 MWth test reactor simulating the neutronic “kernel” of a type of inherently safe epithermal thorium breeder reactor called the Liquid fluoride thorium reactor. It used three fuels: plutonium-239, uranium-235 and uranium-233. The last, 233UF4 was the result of breeding from thorium. Since this was an engineering test, the large, expensive breeding blanket of thorium salt was omitted in favor of neutron measurements.
In the MSRE, the heat from the reactor core was shed via a cooling system using air blowers and radiators. It is thought similar reactors could power high-efficiency heat engines such as closed-cycle gas turbines.
The MSRE’s piping, core vat and structural components were made from Hastelloy-N and its moderator was a pyrolytic graphite core. The fuel for the MSRE was LiF-BeF2-ZrF4-UF4 (65-30-5-0.1), the graphite core moderated it, and its secondary coolant was FLiBe (2LiF-BeF2), it operated as hot as 650 °C and operated for the equivalent of about 1.5 years of full power operation.
The result promised to be a simple, reliable reactor. The purpose of the Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment was to demonstrate that some of the key features of the proposed molten-salt power reactors could be embodied in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably and be maintained without excessive difficulty. For simplicity, it was to be a fairly small, one-fluid (i.e. non-breeding) reactor operating at 10 MW(t) or less, with heat rejection to the air via a secondary (fuel-free) salt.
click here to continue reading…

thenuclearblog:

Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment

The Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was an experimental molten-salt nuclear reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researching this technology through the 1960s; constructed by 1964, it went critical in 1965 and was operated until 1969.

The MSRE was a 7.4 MWth test reactor simulating the neutronic “kernel” of a type of inherently safe epithermal thorium breeder reactor called the Liquid fluoride thorium reactor. It used three fuels: plutonium-239, uranium-235 and uranium-233. The last, 233UF4 was the result of breeding from thorium. Since this was an engineering test, the large, expensive breeding blanket of thorium salt was omitted in favor of neutron measurements.

In the MSRE, the heat from the reactor core was shed via a cooling system using air blowers and radiators. It is thought similar reactors could power high-efficiency heat engines such as closed-cycle gas turbines.

The MSRE’s piping, core vat and structural components were made from Hastelloy-N and its moderator was a pyrolytic graphite core. The fuel for the MSRE was LiF-BeF2-ZrF4-UF4 (65-30-5-0.1), the graphite core moderated it, and its secondary coolant was FLiBe (2LiF-BeF2), it operated as hot as 650 °C and operated for the equivalent of about 1.5 years of full power operation.

The result promised to be a simple, reliable reactor. The purpose of the Molten-Salt Reactor Experiment was to demonstrate that some of the key features of the proposed molten-salt power reactors could be embodied in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably and be maintained without excessive difficulty. For simplicity, it was to be a fairly small, one-fluid (i.e. non-breeding) reactor operating at 10 MW(t) or less, with heat rejection to the air via a secondary (fuel-free) salt.

click here to continue reading…

Link 3 Jun 11 notes Thorium: Cleaner Nuclear Power?»

thenuclearblog:

10 August 2007 by Mitch Beedie

With uranium reserves depleting and fear of terrorism growing, a new opening has been created for the debate on thorium. Mitch Beedie reports.

Decades ago, many countries abandoned the idea of using thorium as a replacement for uranium. But long-term proponents have always believed the thorium fuel cycle could make nuclear energy as safe and sustainable as possible.

But now there are new concerns pushing the thorium debate that revolve around secure uranium supplies and nuclear proliferation – these are encouraging research and development around the world. And then there are nations like India, which has said it aims to base its future nuclear industry on the fuel source.

The attraction for the likes of India are the several major advantages that thorium can claim over uranium. Thorium is seen by some as the nuclear fuel of the future. For a start, there is much more thorium than uranium in the Earth’s crust, and all the thorium mined can be used in a reactor (compared to below 1% of natural uranium). Thorium fuel cycles also produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles.

Uranium-based reactors can be retrofitted, bringing three major benefits – improving security, allaying environmental concerns and improving economics. The fuel cycle can also be proliferation resistant, stopping a reactor from producing nuclear weapons-usable plutonium. And with the spent fuel having significantly reduced volume, weight and long-term radio-toxicity, safety margins are increased and operating costs reduced.

click here to continue reading…

Photo 3 Jun 8 notes junkycosmonaut:

Pripyat, Chernobyl

Graffiti artists said to be from Germany and Belarus have gone round the town of Pripyat drawing silhouettes of the missing population.

junkycosmonaut:

Pripyat, Chernobyl

Graffiti artists said to be from Germany and Belarus have gone round the town of Pripyat drawing silhouettes of the missing population.

Photo 3 Jun 20 notes
Link 3 Jun 9 notes Is thorium the answer to our energy crisis?»

thenuclearblog:

It could power the planet for thousands of years, the reactors would never blow up and the waste is relatively clean. So is thorium the nuclear fuel of the future? Helen Brown reports

It’s a word that’s been generating a steady, background hum in the scientific community for decades now. And the glow of hope emanating from the word “thorium” is now burning brighter than ever. Is this element really the nuclear fuel of the future? Is it really - as some are claiming - cleaner, greener and safer than its scarcer cousin uranium? One thing’s for sure: there are massive reserves of thorium throughout the world, and if the power that represents could be harnessed, it could keep us in energy-saving light bulbs for thousands of years to come. So why aren’t governments investing in the technology needed to make that potential a reality?

Over the past year, Professor Egil Lillestol of the Institute of Physics and Technology at the University of Bergen, has been attempting to convince the world that nuclear reactors fuelled by thorium could be the answer to the world’s energy problems. If we accept that we need alternatives to the CO2-belching fossil fuels, then, Lillestol says: “We all have to do whatever we can to reduce the consumption of energy and to develop solar and wind energy. These are, currently, the only two sources that can give us substantial amounts of renewable energy, but unfortunately far from enough.”

click here to continue reading…

Photo 3 Jun 92 notes frijole:

Operation Sea Orbit: On 31 July 1964, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) (bottom), USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (center) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25) (top) formed “Task Force One,” the first nuclear-powered task force, and sailed 26,540 nmi (49,190 km) around the world in 65 days. Accomplished without a single refueling or replenishment, “Operation Sea Orbit” demonstrated the capability of nuclear-powered surface ships.

frijole:

Operation Sea Orbit: On 31 July 1964, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) (bottom), USS Long Beach (CGN-9) (center) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25) (top) formed “Task Force One,” the first nuclear-powered task force, and sailed 26,540 nmi (49,190 km) around the world in 65 days. Accomplished without a single refueling or replenishment, “Operation Sea Orbit” demonstrated the capability of nuclear-powered surface ships.

Link 3 Jun 1 note Nuclear power that is safe and non-weaponizable»
Photo 3 Jun 21 notes blech:

Three Mile Island, circa 1980, from Postcards of Mushroom Clouds at Slate.

blech:

Three Mile Island, circa 1980, from Postcards of Mushroom Clouds at Slate.

Photo 3 Jun 310 notes pbsthisdayinhistory:

Chernobyl in Pictures
Last year, on the 25th anniversary of the meltdown at Chernobyl, NewsHour science correspondent Miles O’Brien visited Chernobyl to see what life is like there now.See the pictures from his visit and watch his report on the PBS NewsHour site.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Chernobyl in Pictures

Last year, on the 25th anniversary of the meltdown at Chernobyl, NewsHour science correspondent Miles O’Brien visited Chernobyl to see what life is like there now.

See the pictures from his visit and watch his report on the PBS NewsHour site.

Photo 3 Jun 5 notes
via O.

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.